5 Fast Facts About the New FDA Antibiotics Guidelines

Ranchers write down antibiotic adminstration records

Farmers and ranchers take antibiotic use and stewardship very seriously.

Farmers and ranchers are always looking for ways to improve how they raise cattle for beef. Whether it be natural resource use and environmental sustainabilty, improving animal care, or responsible use of antibiotics, farmers and ranchers care about improving and responding to consumer preferences. Real changes happen daily on farms, ranches and feedyards around the country.

Real Change is Underway

We’ve talked in previous posts about how and why antibiotics are used in raising cattle for beef, as well as the long-standing commitment of cattle producers to using antibiotics judiciously. In addition to Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) Judicious Use Guidelines which have been in place since the 1980s, the beef industry is now working to reduce the use of antibiotics that are medically important to humans under new guidelines from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) known as FDA Guidance 209 and 213, which will be enforced by the federal government. The new antibiotics use guidelines will be fully enacted by January 1, 2017, but cattle farmers, ranchers and feedyard managers have already begun implementing these changes, many of them going above and beyond what is required by law, working with veterinary health professionals, regulatory officials and the general public to ensure healthy animals and safe beef.

Here are five fast facts about the new FDA antibiotics guidelines:

  1. The new FDA guidelines will restrict the use of antibiotics in livestock that are used in feed and water and are medically important to human health. These drugs will no longer be used for growth promotion and will only be used to treat, prevent and control disease only under the oversight of a veterinarian.
  2. Farmers and ranchers will be required to form even stronger relationships with a licensed veterinarian, called a veterinarian-client-patient relationship, in order to receive authorization from their veterinarian for the appropriate antibiotic for a specified illness for a specific time period.
  3. Per FDA guidelines, farmers and ranchers will utilize very specific detailed orders for antibiotics in feed as authorized by veterinarians, called veterinary feed directives, that will outline exactly how long an antibiotic can be used, for what illness and for a specific number of animals. Increased use of detailed records on the part of the farmer or rancher and their veterinarian will enable them to more precisely evaluate their use of antibiotics.
  4. Farmers and ranchers are continually seeking new and effective cattle health and nutrition alternatives, such as probiotics or nutritional supplements, which can help contribute to improved overall herd health and may reduce the need for some antibiotics. Looking for alternatives to antibiotics is an ongoing area of research throughout agriculture. In fact, many animal health companies have pledged significant resources to further researching these alternatives.
  5. In addition to what is required by law, the beef community is committed to going above and beyond to ensure responsible antibiotic use in animals to protect the efficacy of antibiotics for humans and animals. This year, cattle farmers and ranchers have made further research on antibiotic resistance their number one research priority and are directly investing their dollars to advance research in this area. Additionally, the industry is proactively developing educational materials, including webinars, posters, presentations at local and national meetings and other training resources in order to educate cattle farmers, ranchers and feedyard owners to ensure that they are equipped with the resources they need to follow these new guidelines. Partnerships with groups like the American Academy of Bovine Practitioners and other science-based organizations are ongoing and instrumental in making sure that we’re protecting the health of animals, while simultaneously protecting public health.

Healthy Cattle, Safe Beef

When it comes to healthy animals, no one cares more than farmers and ranchers. The beef that farmers and ranchers raise and sell to restaurants and supermarkets is the same beef they feed their own families, so it’s no surprise that they want the best care for their livestock to ensure everyone has safe, healthy beef. Implementing new antibiotics guidelines from the FDA and working with their veterinarians more closely than ever before is just one example of how the cattle industry is continuously improving.

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